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“ . . . [Davita] Malo wrote a letter to Kenahu to pass along to the King [Kamehameha III] . . . ‘If a big wave comes in, large fishes will come from the dark ocean which you never saw before. And when they see the small fishes they will eat them up. The ships of the white men have come and smart people have arrived from the great countries which you have never seen before. They know our people are few in number and living in a small country. They will eat us up. Such has always been the case with large countries. The small ones have been gobbled up.’”

Captive Paradise: A History of Hawaii
James L. Haley

“We cannot enter into alliances until we are acquainted with the designs of our neighbors.”

The Art of War
Sun Tzu

“When the Blount report was made public in July [1893], its shock waves rattled all the interested parties. To the extent that [Lorrin A.] Thurston and [provisional government president Sanford B.] Dole relied on [former U.S. congressman James Henderson] Blount's Southern heritage to color his view of the racial component of the situation, the Georgia planter blasted their hopes without mercy. After stating what credit the native Hawaiians reflected upon themselves with their high literacy rate, Blount went on to characterize the natives as ‘over generous, hospitable, almost free from revenge, very courteous, especially to females. Their talent for oratory and the higher branches of mathematics is unusually marked. The small amount of thieving and absence of beggary are more marked than among the best races in the world. What they are capable of under fair conditions is an unsolved problem.’ In his report Blount did not venture to advise President Cleveland on a course of action. His conclusions, however, were unmistakable: ‘The undoubted sentiment of the people is for the Queen [Liliʻuokalani], against the provisional government and against annexation. A majority of the whites, especially the Americans, is for annexation.’”

Captive Paradise: A History of Hawaii
James L. Haley